The Good Girl Revolution


Modest Proposals: Take Back the Campus (Panel - November 13, 5pm - 7pm)

Location:

Ethics and Public Policy Center
1015 15th ST, NW, Suite 900
Washington, DC 20005

November 13, 5pm - 7pm

Many college campuses across the country report rising numbers of sexual assaults, date rapes, and sexually-transmitted infections. And there is reason to believe the "hook up" culture -- the prevalence of sexual activity with "no strings attached" -- is affecting students’ mental health.

Are students today well-educated about healthy relationships? Are college administrators taking the right approach to reducing health risks? On November 13, five experts will come together to discuss the state of affairs on campus -- and some modest proposals.

Laura Sessions Stepp is a Washington Post writer and author of Unhooked (2007). Dr. Miriam Grossman is a campus psychiatrist at UCLA and author of Unprotected (2006). Wendy Shalit is author of A Return to Modesty (1999) and Girls Gone Mild (2007). Cassandra DeBenedetto is a recent graduate of Princeton University and founder of Princeton's Anscombe Society. Dawn Eden is director of the Cardinal Newman Society's Love and Responsibility Program and author of The Thrill of the Chaste (2007).

A book signing and wine-and-cheese reception will follow the discussion.

REGISTRATION: You must register to attend this event.
E-mail: send your name and affiliation to mrybak@eppc.org.
Fax: your name and affiliation to (202) 408-0632, with attention to Mary Rose Rybak.

Sponsored by the Ethics and Public Policy Center and the Cardinal Newman Society, with additional support from the Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute.



More Information
Mary Rose Rybak
1015 15th St, NW
Suite 900
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-682-1200
Fax: 202-408-0632
E-mail: mrybak@thenewatlantis.com


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Notable and Quotable

"Well-meaning experts and parents say that they understand kids' wanting to be 'bad' instead of 'good.' Yet this reversal of adults' expectations is often experienced not as a gift of freedom but a new kind of oppression."

— From The Good Girl Revolution